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History of Art Timeline

The historical past of art is usually told as a chronology of masterpieces created during each civilization. It can thus be framed as a narrative of high culture, epitomized by the Wonders of the World. On any other hand, vernacular art expressions can even be integrated into art historic narratives, called folk arts or craft. The more intently that an art historian engages with these latter sorts of low culture, the much more likely it is that they will determine their work as analyzing visual culture or cloth culture, or as contributing to fields associated with art historical past, akin to anthropology or archaeology. In the latter cases, art gadgets may be called archeological artifacts. Surviving art from this era comprises small carvings in stone or bone and cave painting. The first traces of human-made gadgets appeared in southern Africa, the Western Mediterranean, Central and Eastern Europe Adriatic Sea, Siberia Baikal Lake, India, and Australia. These first traces are general…
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These gorgeous puzzles are actual works of art

Our team is dedicated to finding and telling you more about the products and deals we love. If you love them too and decide to purchase through the links below, we may receive a commission. Pricing and availability are subject to change. If you're looking for a way to occupy time indoors, puzzles are a great option. But puzzles featuring art by talented women artists that you'll actually want to frame after completing? That's even better.Woman-founded brand Jiggy sells puzzles featuring art prints by women artists, and you'll actually want to hang them in your home. Prioritizing bold colors and vibrant mot ifs, the puzzle brand was created to shake up the jigsaw industry after founder Kaitlyn Marcotte was uninspired by selections for millennial and Gen Z puzzle enthusiasts."All the options were super cheesy stock photography, watercolor animals and landscapes and stuff," Marcotte tells Forbes.The art featured on Jiggy puzzles is created by emerging women ar…

OJESH Soiree in Shanghai – A Light Art Extravaganza

The beauty of art lurks within the magical and the poetic, infiltrating the air with its nuance.The beauty of nature burgeons like a sublime aurora. Explore the fashion and art that are everlasting, and let the world reveal itself to your senses. Inspired by the wisdom of natural skin care, OJESH harmonized art and fashion in a cultural fiesta of unprecedented scale. On the evening of August 7, OJESH created a cross-boundary celebration of art and fashion, characterized by a stylish elegance, with Group 55. Numerous distinguished guests and celebrities were invited to the event to reflect on the beauty of fashion and art. The banquet oozed the ambience of timeless elegance and beautiful simplicity. Mr. Wang Jiayi, Founder of the OJESH brand, Ms. Ning Rui, CEO in Greater China of Jassen Group Germany, Mr. Xiao Jianfeng, Head of OJESH Operation and Mr. Xiang Yu, Director of OJESH Branding and Marketing worked together with Ms. Sumang, "Queen of Fashion", Carols Morell Orlandis…

Art Schlichter’s 'sad, tragic' life behind bars

Art Schlichter sometimes shakes uncontrollably and he sometimes forgets. What was that first bet he ever placed? What did it feel like to be a Heisman Trophy candidate at Ohio State? Which year was it that NFL commissioner Pete Rozelle banned him from the league?He has tremors that come and go.What a peculiar feeling this is compared to being that invincible quarterback. That guy who placed his first bet with some buddies and felt ecstasy he could never describe no matter how hard he tried.The only way to capture the high was to do it again. And again and again.Get the news delivered to your inbox: Sign up for our morning, afternoon and evening newslettersSchlichter is 60 and he is a far cry from that rugged, dark-haired, charismatic man whom one of his mentors says was so electric he could have been the governor of Ohio.He wears thin, wrinkled prison garb. He frets about the prison air being filled with COVID-19. And he cannot for the life of him fill in all the blanks.He has been di…

BWW Blog: When Art Can't Be the Outlet

The shutdown of Broadway and most/all theatrical activity this summer hit me hard.I discovered theatre at age four. When I saw my first show, it was so early in my life that I can't even fully remember the experience. All I can remember is the warmth I felt in my heart when the stage lights came up, the way my breath caught in the back of my throat as the music swelled, and the joy that overcame me as I leapt to my feet to give a standing ovation during bows. From then on, I was in love. Obsessed. I couldn't believe that something so gorgeous, so communal and connected, existed in this world. I was four ye ars old and so early in life, I was able to see that the world was a glorious place to be in - a place full of art and music and costumes and flashing lights and dancing. I began auditioning for community theatre immediately. I memorized a full script before I learned how to read. I watched movie musicals, searched plays online, and carefully studied videos of choreography…

Philadelphia Museum of Art Workers Unionize, With 89% Majority Vote

The Philadelphia Museum of Art (photo by via Shinya Suzuki via Flickr) Workers at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) have voted to unionize, with an 89% majority of votes in favor. The PMA Union will be affiliated with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees District Council 47 (AFSCME DC 47), becoming one of the largest unionized museum workforces in the country.The workers publicly announced their decision to schedule a union election in June, citing issues of pay, compensation, and benefits, as well as transparency. The museum faced a series of workplace harassment controversies this year related to two former employees, Joshua R. Helmer and and James A. Cincotta.News of the union election came amid a wave of staff cuts at PMA, which said it projected a $6.5 million budget shortfall for the coming fiscal year due to the pandemic. The vote follows significant layoffs announced on Tuesday, of 85 employees who were furloughed in June.In another victory, t…

Art Industry News: Donald Trump Asked Whether His Face Could Be Added to Mount Rushmore + Other Stories

Art Industry News is a daily digest of the most consequential developments coming out of the art world and art market. Here's what you need to know on this Monday, August 10. NEED-TO-READ Tate Head Defends Job Cuts – Tate Modern director Maria Balshaw defended the gallery's controversial plans to cut around 200 jobs from its commercial arm, which runs its shops and cafes. On the Radio 4 program Desert Island Disks, Balshaw explained that the division was "too big" given that Tate is expecting its attendance to drop by half for the foreseeable future. She added that the museum delayed the move as long as possible, and pledged that "as visitors do return… [the workers] will be given the first option to come back and work for us because we recognize the hard work that they do and how valuable they are to us." (BBC)Albright-Knox Sues Engineer – The Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo is suing the engineering company that designed its warehouse extension in 2…

Art Collector wins Ellis Park Derby, earns Kentucky Derby points

HENDERSON, Ky. -- Blue Grass winner Art Collector led all the way in winning the $200,000 Ellis Park Derby by 3¼ lengths on Sunday and earning 50 qualifying points for next month's Kentucky Derby.Ridden by Brian Hernandez Jr., Art Collector ran 1⅛ miles in 1:48.02 and paid $2.80, $2.20 and $2.10.Attachment Rate returned $8 and $5.40 and earned 20 Derby points. Necker Island was another 2½ lengths back in third and paid $8 to show. He earned 10 points. Rowdy Yates was fourth and earned five points.Art Collector improved to 4-0 since joining trainer Tom Drury's barn. The colt has 150 total points and is third on the Kentucky Derby leaderboard for the Sept. 5 race.It was the first time in the track's 98-year history that it hosted a Kentucky Derby qualifier. It did so as a result of changes to the qualifying races caused by the coronavirus pandemic.