Skip to main content

Posts

How an Unlikely Alliance Among the Government, the Art Industry, and a Nightclub Pulled Off a Socially Distanced Berlin Art Week

It was an unusual sight. On Monday evening this week, collector Christian Boros stood with Berlin's culture minister Klaus Lederer as they finished their cigarettes in front of Berghain nightclub before heading past the bouncer and into a press preview for an art show they co-funded.The show, which started three months ago as a patchwork idea to help both Berghain and the city's artists recover lost income, has emerged as a polished exhibition featuring the work of more than 100 Berlin creatives. Just as notably, it also represents the first collaboration among the senate, a private collector, and a techno club.New interim models like this are cropping up all over town during Berlin Art Week. A year marked by flux and precarity has been met with innovation and collaboration.The strife of lockdown has largely ravaged Berlin's cultural economy—its main draw. Yet there is a bright side: for the first time, new worlds have collided. The Berlin Biennial, the well-cultivated Gal…

The Art of Selecting the Perfect Bourbon Barrel

Since people first started making bourbon, arguably the easiest part of the whole production process has been selecting the type of barrel used for aging the whiskey. As decreed by the United States Congress in 1954, bourbon must be aged in a new, charred American oak container. Most distillers opt for the standard 53-gallon American white oak barrel, add their spirit to it and, after a few years, bottle the whiskey. However, as Jefferson's Bourbon founder Trey Zoeller discovered not long after launching the brand with his father in 1997, sticking only to this traditional aging method doesn't allow for much innovation or excitement. His hope was to make whiskey that truly pushed the conventional boundaries of bourbon.Around the time Zoeller began developing his globetrotting lead innovation bourbon Jefferson's Ocean, he also became increasingly interested in how he could finish his whiskey in other types of barrels. This led him to visit the Independent Stave Company (ISC)…

Art in the Park gets underway with online marketplace

The event is a huge fundraiser for the Boise Art Museum. It runs through Sept. 18.BOISE, Idaho — Getting creative to hold a major event that supports creativity.Art in the Park got underway Thursday morning -- virtually.  It runs through Sept. 18.Art in the Park has a been a signature summer event in the City of Trees for more than six decades.  Every summer dozens and dozens of artists and craftspeople, and thousands and thousands of arts and crafts lovers have filled Julia Davis Park for the fundraiser.It's a great way for the artists to reach customers and make money.It's also a huge fundraiser for the Boise Art Museum or BAM.But the coronavirus pandemic has forced organizers to get creative, something that artistic folks are certainly good at doing.So, for the 66th version of the event, Art in the Park is all online, with BAM's virtual Art in the Park marketplace.BAM Executive Director Melanie Fales says the event is especially critical this year because of the pandemi…

Forrest Fenn, Art Dealer Who Enticed Thousands to Hunt for Hidden Treasure, Dies at 90

"He loved families and he loved the idea of getting them out in the mountains and the open air, and his great joy was talking to the families that were seeking the treasure," said Dorothy Massey, the owner of Collected Works Bookstore in Santa Fe, who called Mr. Fenn a friend and a mentor. "That was the important thing to him."Ms. Massey said Mr. Fenn had given her store the publishing rights to "The Thrill of the Chase," which drew so many explorers to Santa Fe that it had "quite an effect on the general economy of the city."Forrest Burke Fenn was born on Aug. 22, 1930, in Temple, Texas. He spent idyllic summers fishing around Yellowstone National Park, and hunting for arrowheads with his father, a schoolteacher, and his football coach, both avid collectors. He found his first arrowhead when he was 9 and told The New York Times in 2017 that it was still "the most prized possession in my collection.""My father taught me to not …

Model Your Favorite Works of Art With Coach x Basquiat

We love these products, and we hope you do too. E! has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the revenue from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not E!.Beloved New York City artist Jean-Michel Basquiat has teamed up with Coach for a bold new collection. His Neo-Expressionist art, with references to African art and American pop culture, can now be worn on Coach bagsclothing items or accessories. Plus, some of your favorite cel ebs like Jennifer Lopez are modeling the designs.Shop the highlights from Basquiat's unique collection below. You'll be sure to find a new statement piece to add to your wardrobe!

Cam Heyward thought extension talks were “dead” before meeting with Art Rooney II

With talks about a new contract at a standstill heading into the final weekend before the start of the 2020 season, Steelers defensive end Cam Heyward had just about given up hope of striking a deal.The Steelers had sounded some pessimistic notes about the possibility of getting anything done even as they called keeping Heyward a priority and the team's policy of not negotiating contracts during the season forced Heyward to contemplate moving on after the season."We were going back and forth for a good bit," Heyward said, via Ray Fittipaldo of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. "When it got done, we were like, 'Wow, we're spent.' This took a lot of work to get done. There was a time when I thought it was dead. I was getting ready for my farewell tour. I'm a very emotional person. Quietly, I was trying to distance myself a bit. I had to prepare myself for the day I wasn't going to be a Pittsburgh Steeler. I had to prepare myself that this was my last ri…

The Art World Tiptoes Back, With Virtual Sculpture and Chatty Avatars

The art world typically reconvenes after Labor Day, with participants flocking to museums, galleries and fairs to socialize and suss out the season's potential breakout artists and blockbuster exhibits. This fall, curators and dealers say they expect a trickle of guests, not crowds.Art lovers have already masked up and returned, in reduced numbers, to New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and other places. More institutions are set to reopen by Halloween. But the atmosphere is subdued, with auctions still largely being conducted online and fairs such as Art Basel Miami Beach canceling last week. However, artists didn't cease creating during the lockdown. Here is how their work is changing—and where you can find it this season: Fall Entertainment Preview Fall is weird this year. But that doesn't mean it is canceled. The Wall Street Journal distills the trends shaping the fall entertainment season in a series of stories this week about what's coming in books, mov…