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Greenwood resident finds joy in variety, potential of art

The bright colors were all around her.

Growing up in Texas, Patricia Voelz was surrounded by the vivid folk art made by local artists. Blues, reds, pinks, purples, yellows and other hues seemed to leap from public installations, paintings and murals that dominated her community.

With every work that she saw, Voelz was laying the foundation for her life as an artist.

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"Sweet Kitty" by Patricia Voelz, a Greenwood artist who will be the featured artist for August at the Southside Art League. Submitted photo.

"Razzle Dazzle" by Patricia Voelz, a Greenwood artist who will be the featured artist for August at the Southside Art League. Submitted photo.

"Swallowtail Sunrise" by Patricia Voelz, a Greenwood artist who will be the featured artist for August at the Southside Art League. Submitted photo.

"Summer Delight" by Patricia Voelz, a Greenwood artist who will be the featured artist for August at the Southside Art League. Submitted photo.

"Vintage Calla Lilies" by Patricia Voelz, a Greenwood artist who will be the featured artist for August at the Southside Art League. Submitted photo.

"Pink Poppies" by Patricia Voelz, a Greenwood artist who will be the featured artist for August at the Southside Art League. Submitted photo.

"Red Sail in the Sunset" by Patricia Voelz, a Greenwood artist who will be the featured artist for August at the Southside Art League. Submitted photo.

"I was really inspired by the bright colors and designs of the Mexican art. That was all around me," she said.

From her creative childhood, Voelz has blossomed into a career in art that includes a little bit of everything. She works in oil paint, watercolor and acrylics, and uses Zentangle — a method employing dots, lines, simple curves, S-curves and orbs — to create unique mosaic creations. Puzzle pieces are implemented into funky collages.

All of her work is characterized by the use of color to convey emotion and atmosphere.

Voelz is the featured artist for August at the Southside Art League's Off Broadway Gallery, where viewers can discover the breadth of her creative spirit.

"My interest in creating art is in all mediums. I began painting in oil, then gravitated towards acrylic because of the convenience of it. But I also love watercolor and colored pencils and Sharpies and ink. I do a lot of collage. I like to try anything I can find," she said. "Anything I can find to make an unusual piece of art."

The vivacity of Texan and Mexican art were not the only aspects that influenced Voelz as a child. When she was young, she'd draw Disney characters and other figures, Her older sister, Bette, who was also an artist, worked with her and emphasized coloring in the lines.

Those lessons stuck with her throughout her life.

"She taught me a lot, and took me under her wings," Voelz said.

Throughout her life, Voelz studied with a number of artists in Texas and later in Indiana, where she moved as an adult to raise her family. Those teachers, and other artists she spent time with, helped her learn a variety of techniques, which she brings together in different, often unexpected ways.

"That has had a positive influence on my art, because every time you do that, you learn something. If you use what you learned, you'll be able to bring it forward and take advantage of it in different ways," she said.

The variety of mediums has allowed Voelz to maximize the creativity of her work. For example, a colorful butterfly with yellow, blue and orange wings perches on a bright pink plant, with more muted pastel background behind it.

A rooster painted in watercolor with a body made up of varying designs, shapes and textures comes together in "Zen Rooster."

Green, pink and white puzzle pieces come together to form a slice of watermelon that practically drips off the collage.

"I'm always looking for something I can draw or paint on a daily basis. Every time I see something, I think, 'How could I paint that?' or 'I'd like to paint that,'" she said.

With the show at the Southside Art League, Voelz will include a variety of her pieces and styles to showcase the breadth of her interests. She hopes that through her story, people will understand that while artistic talent can in some ways be inherited in a person, it also requires constant refining and sharpening.

"An interest in creating art may be inherited, but honing the craft takes the three Ps — practice, perseverance and production. I encourage everyone to find the muse and give art a try," she said.

At a glance

Patricia Voelz exhibition

What: Artwork in a variety of styles and mediums from Voelz, a Greenwood artist

Where: Southside Art League Off Broadway Gallery, 299 E. Broadway, Greenwood

When: Through Aug. 29

Gallery hours: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday through Tuesday.

More about the artist: dailypaintworks.com/artists/patricia-voelz-3492

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