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Nancy Pelosi Masters the Art of the Color-Coordinated Face Mask

Among the many debates currently roaring on Capitol Hill in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis, one of the most controversial is that of whether or not we should all be wearing face masks. At the beginning of April, the Trump administration reversed their initial policy by recommending face coverings as a voluntary measure to help quell the spread of the virus, and more recently issued an order for all West Wing employees to wear masks. Yet, in typically Trumpian style, the President is reportedly afraid of being seen wearing one in public for fear of looking "weak." The issue has become something of a lightning rod topic, and yet another example of Trump's efforts to stoke the flames of a divisive culture war that has seen some states adhering to government mandates after being swamped with coronavirus cases, while others protest (confusingly, with Trump's implicit support) and demand the lockdown be ended.

Photo: Getty Images

Outside of all that chaos, however, there is one senior government official who is not afraid to step out in public the responsible way—and she's also been giving the face mask a quietly stylish twist. As the Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi's efforts to push through a $3 trillion aid package to help stymy the effects of COVID-19 on the American populace may be making the headlines right now, and for good reason. But for those observing her outfits during her regular press appearances, it's impossible not to notice that she's also been taking the time to make sure her face coverings—whether masks or scarves—neatly match her outfit.

Photo: Getty Images

One eagle-eyed figure who spotted Pelosi's sartorial efforts is none other than Hillary Clinton. The former Democratic Presidential nominee took to Instagram to laud Pelosi as not just "Leader of the House majority," but also that of "mask-to-pantsuit coordination." (And if there's one thing Clinton knows, it's how to style out a pantsuit.) There may be many more important things going on in the world right now, but Pelosi's matching face masks are a gentle reminder that clothing, and even the simple act of getting dressed, can bring a little joy during these dark times, even for those working hard to solve the current crisis at the highest levels of office. If we're all going to be wearing face masks for the near future, why not include a little pop of matching color to brighten up our day?

Originally Appeared on Vogue

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