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Showing posts from April, 2020

Dark Rey Channels Palpatine's Royal Guards in Chilling The Rise of Skywalker Art

We have another alternative look at Dark Rey from Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker . Artist Adam Brockbank has been sharing several alternative looks that were considered for one of Daisy Ridley's biggest moments in the finale of the Skywalker saga. In this case, Rey is channeling a different figure from the dark side in the form of Palpatine's Royal Guard. Taking to Instagram, Concept Artist Adam Brockbank revealed a new piece of art that was done early on during pre-production. It sees Rey, looking pale with yellow eyes, much like her grandfather Palpatine. But it's her wardrobe choice here that is particularly interesting, as she is clad in villainous red robes, which are reminiscent of the Royal Guard, aka the Red Guard, that we first saw in Return of the Jedi. It is also cut from the same cloth as the Praetorian Guards, who Rey battled alongside Kylo Ren in The Last Jedi. Brockbank provided the following caption with the image. RELATED: The Rise of Skywalker

Online Art Class Gives Break to Home Schooling Parents

A new online tool is helping a San Diego mother give her kids a break from their home school routine while still keeping them engaged educationally. The set up might be the same at many homes: students with headsets staring at a computer screen. But for one special hour, the Delgado sisters take pencil to paper and use a little imagination through the temporarily online art program Drawn2Art . "It's relaxing and it makes you like think a lot and like focus on your art and it's really calm," said Elise Delgado. The Delgado sisters' mother Bethany Delgado home schools all six of her children, so their day-to-day hasn't changed drastically since school district closures sent most other families into a frenzy. "It's actually been a blessing. We have gotten a lot of time together. A lot of time to spend on family relationships and board games and card games," said Bethany Delgado. Even though she wasn't thrown into

HOA asks Conroe family to take down daughter's 'stay home' art from window

First Service Residential sent the family a violation notice calling 4-year-old Giuliana's colored pictures "unsightly articles" that would drop property values. CONROE, Texas — A Conroe family is standing up to their homeowner's association after they were sent a violation notice instructing them to remove their daughter's quarantine art from their windows. The HOA described them as "unsightly articles." Staying home has been an adventure for many families. Andrea's 4-year-old daughter Giuliana has found her purpose in color filling in coloring books with joy. Her mom started sharing her pictures with the neighborhood. "I thought, 'Let's put a couple of pictures on the window to share,'" Andrea said. "And it gives her a little extra pride to say this is the picture of the day that I did." "Why did we put them on the window?" Andrea asked her daughter. "To make o

Animal Crossing update adds events, art gallery and new characters (including a shady fox)

© NINTENDO Animal Crossing: New Horizons has really taken the gaming world by storm , and Nintendo is delivering eager fans yet another update to the title, which lets you create your own island and decorate it to your liking, island-hop with friends, and really make it your own. Now Nintendo is giving users even more things to do . This time around, it's adding art to the museum, bushes (we're taking azaleas and tea olives) via a garden shop, a boat that sells art, and new seasonal events. There's a lot to unpack, so let's take off on the next Dodo Airlines flight and land on our island. If you're like us, you've been painstakingly decorating your island since you started playing. But now you might have to rework some of your layout choices to make room for bushes. Yes, Leif is arriving on your island and opening up a garden shop. You'll be able to purchase seeds and saplings, but the big news is bushes. Based on the teaser video, we're getting fo

Japan's Art House Theaters Launch "Temporary Cinema" Streamer Amid Pandemic

MOVIES 3:55 AM PDT 4/27/2020 by Patrick Brzeski A collection of Japan's art house cinemas have banded together to launch a streaming service, dubbed the "Temporary Cinema," to keep the country's indie film community afloat during the novel coronavirus pandemic. The platform is launching with a lineup of 10 Japanese and international indie movies that previously were scheduled to open theatrically at independent cinemas in the country throughout the spring. The price charged to stream each film will be roughly the same as what movie theaters would have charged for a single ticket (usually around 1,800 yen, or $17). The organizers of the initiative say that proceeds will be shared equally by two parties: participating cinemas and the films' distributors. That's the same 50-50 split that undergirds Japan's theatrical film business during normal circumstances. The project was spearheaded by local independent film distributor Tofoo Films and d

Minnesota-born art scholar John Driscoll dies of COVID-19 complications

Minnesota-born, New York-based art dealer and scholar John Driscoll was a perfect combination of intelligence and friendliness. Originally from the small town of Clarkfield , Minn., he kept a container of soil from his hometown in a desk drawer. The scholar and art dealer, who owned Driscoll Babcock Gallery in New York City, died April 10 in Putnam County, New York, due to complications from COVID-19. He was 70.

Art Reality Studio arms artists with VR gear and asks: What if?

We are inside Keith Tolch's brain. As in, walking around. It's a futuristic landscape, a maze of empty rooms with soaring ceilings and glowing, neon-lit floors, everything bathed in an '80s-era palette of screaming-pink, orange and lime green. Random objects — a deconstructed 1967 Mustang, glass cubes brimming with swirly paint markings, delicate pencil drawings of butterflies and roosters — float by. But, wait. Disrobed of the plastic, padded headset, we are actually in a gleaming Eagle Rock warehouse, a former auto body repair shop-turned-artists' studio, and Tolch is perched behind a computer console, beaming. His piece, "Glass Bottom Brain," is an interactive, virtual reality artwork — meaning viewers don a high-resolution headset and descend into an immersive, 3-D digital environment in which they can navigate through bits and pieces of Tolch's subconscious. He created the piece with expensive state-of-the-art computer equipment, but Tolch di

Mother's Day art contest now open to all Fort Bend County young artists

For kids who are bored with sidewalk drawings, Missouri City is hosting a Mother's Day Art Contest. For kids who are bored with sidewalk drawings, Missouri City is hosting a Mother's Day Art Contest. Photo: Kristi Nix Image 1 of 1 For kids who are bored with sidewalk drawings, Missouri City is hosting a Mother's Day Art Contest. For kids who are bored with sidewalk drawings, Missouri City is hosting a Mother's Day Art Contest. Photo: Kristi Nix Mother's Day art contest now open to all Fort Bend County young artists 1  /  1 Back to Gallery There's good news for kids stuck at home due to COVID-19 school closures who are tired of drawing on the sidewalk: the City of Missouri City's annual Mother's Day Cake Decorating Event is being re-tooled this year as a Mother's Day Art Contest and Drive-Through event featuring prizes for winners in several different age and grade c

The Bankerization of the Art Market: How Wall Street’s Masters of the Universe Infiltrated the Art World

A version of this story first appeared in the spring 2020  Artnet Intelligence Report . Art dealers were on vacation when Patrick Drahi pulled off the biggest deal many of them had ever seen. It was June 2019, right after Art Basel, a fallow period when gallery honchos and auction chairmen rent homes in Italy or go island hopping in Greece. Drahi, a telecom billionaire in charge of the multinational corporation Altice, plunked down $3.7 billion in cash and debt to acquire Sotheby's, which had been traded publicly for more than three decades. Less than two years after the art world had watched, aghast, as a buyer believed to be Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman spent $450.3 million on Leonardo da Vinci's Salvator Mundi, a man had stepped up and paid more than eight times that—not on an artwork but on a chunk of the art world itself. Patrick Drahi, Sotheby's new owner, in 2016. (Photo by Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images) This, presumably, was good

Ville Platte woman sharing art to help others during pandemic

A Ville Platte woman is finding comfort through art to cope with the Covid-19 pandemic and a family tragedy. She's the daughter of Joyce Thomas , the Ville Platte woman who went missing and was found dead earlier this year. Brecky Lavigne says working on a mosaic has helped her heal and she's hoping to bring that same healing to others during these uncertain times. Under her artist name, Toshbug, she created a kit to help others create mosaic art. The kit includes all the supplies you need to create mosaic coasters. "Art comforts always,"Lavigne said. "I believe that with all of my being because for me this really is a healing especially these last few months. We suffered a tragic loss with our mother and I just really gravitated towards the arts." Lavigne is still grieving her mother's death, but she's found comfort through art."It allows you to express yourself because sometimes there are words that you can't really say and how y

Tlaib asks private equity firm to cover insurance for Art Van workers

Lauren Coleman-Lochner and Eliza Ronalds-Hannon, Bloomberg Published 7:50 p.m. ET April 22, 2020 | Updated 9:09 a.m. ET April 23, 2020 U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib called on private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners to pay for health insurance for Art Van Furniture workers who lost coverage after the Midwestern retailer shut down. Art Van filed for bankruptcy last month and told workers they would have 90 days of coverage as the retailer slowly sold off its stores. But as the new coronavirus spread, many states forced stores to shut down, turning the company’s liquidation into more of a fire sale. The company later told employees they would lose insurance about six weeks earlier than planned. Workers sent a letter on Tuesday asking Thomas H. Lee Partners, Art Van’s private equity owner, to restore their health coverage. Tlaib, who represents a district in Michigan that includes parts of Detroit, is the latest politician to call for more help for workers at bankrupt companie

Tlaib asks Thomas H. Lee to cover insurance for Art Van workers

Lauren Coleman-Lochner and Eliza Ronalds-Hannon, Bloomberg Published 7:50 p.m. ET April 22, 2020 | Updated 10:36 p.m. ET April 22, 2020 U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib called on private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners to pay for health insurance for Art Van Furniture workers who lost coverage after the Midwestern retailer shut down. Rep. Rashida Tlaib locks arms with eight airline workers at Detroit Metro protesting Delta for better wages on Friday, Feb. 14, 2020. (Photo: Unite Here) Art Van filed for bankruptcy last month and told workers they would have 90 days of coverage as the retailer slowly sold off its stores. But as the new coronavirus spread, many states forced stores to shut down, turning the company’s liquidation into more of a fire sale. The company later told employees they would lose insurance about six weeks earlier than planned. Workers sent a letter on Tuesday asking Thomas H. Lee Partners, Art Van’s private equity owner, to restore their health cov

ArtFields, South Carolina’s biggest art competition, is on hold due to COVID-19

On March 17, the Lake City arts festival/competition ArtFields announced it was postponing the festival. The event, which was scheduled to go from April 24 to May 2, would have featured nearly 400 different works of art by artists from around the Southeast, displayed in various venues around the town. Between visitor selections and judges’ picks, the artists involved had chances to win nearly $150,000 in cash prizes. ArtFields, which began in 2013, typically draws about 20,000 people, per organizer estimates, and it injects millions of dollars into the local economy. So needless to say, the decision to postpone the festival due to the COVID-19 outbreak wasn’t an easy one. “It was absolutely heartbreaking,” says Jamison Kerr, ArtFields’ director. “We work for months leading up to this, and we truly had one of the best bodies of artwork we have seen, so it was hard not to be disappointed. I never thought I would see an April in Lake City without artwork delivery, ne

This Free Game Lets Users Build Their Own Virtual Art Museums

Thanks to an ever-growing catalog of digital exhibitions, virtual tours and other online cultural offerings, art lovers sequestered at home amid the COVID-19 pandemic have plenty of options for socially distanced creative expression. For those who prefer a do-it-yourself approach to artistic appreciation, consider downloading " Occupy White Walls ," a free video game that allows users to design their own art gallery. Available on gaming platform Steam , the building experience features 2,200 unique architectural elements—including spiral staircases, art deco lighting and stained glass windows—and more than 6,000 artworks ranging from Old Master paintings to contemporary creations. Daisy, an artificial intelligence assistant curator, is available to help interpret users' collections and suggest works they might enjoy. "I always struggle to define it," Yarden Yaroshevski, chief executive of StikiPixels , the London-based tech firm behind the game, tells t

A Collapsing Art Market Will Hurt Underrepresented Artists the Most. Here’s How to Ensure Their Voices Are Not Lost

Last month, as we switched off the lights at Goodman Gallery, closing our spaces alongside fellow galleries around the world in response to COVID-19, my head was spinning. I tried to find comfort in the innovative possibilities of online art-viewing and to seek solace in the healing impact of reduced emissions on the environment, not to mention the joy of extended quality time with my eight-year-old son. But my mind kept returning to the huge overheads attached to running three galleries across the United Kingdom and South Africa. We are facing a worldwide recession and it is predicted that the economies of African countries will be hit particularly hard. It dawned on me that the future of the global art world, and whether it will include the diverse kinds of galleries that have been sorely lacking until recently, lies very precariously in the balance. A week later, South Africa went into lockdown and our fragile economy was downgraded to junk status. For a country that alrea

Mastering the Art of Making a French Omelette

A few years ago, when I was a student at l'Institut Paul Bocuse , one of the premier cooking colleges in France, I watched an omelette-making class through a glass partition. I was in a hallway, in the school's zone culinaire, which is reserved for lessons in making food; theory courses are held on another floor, in small rooms with desks. This particular class was on French kitchen basics. I'd been exempted, on the grounds that I'd worked in restaurants. (The confidence the exemption implied in my skills would, alas, turn out to be spectacularly misplaced.) A student presented his omelette. The instructor poked it and shook his head. He didn't bother to taste it; he just tipped it into the trash. An omelette must be soft in the middle, pillowy to the touch. It should have bounce. This one was hard. The next student's omelette was too voluminous. The instructor admonished him. It was like watching a movie without sound. His gestures said, "Why did y